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The excellent photo exhibition “Friends of the Sea” is touring the Adriatic

first_imgFor the seventh year in a row, an attractive exhibition of the “Friends of the Sea” project is touring the squares and waterfronts of the Croatian Adriatic. During the summer of 2016, over 13 million visitors will see the exhibition in XNUMX Croatian destinationsIn 2009, the Rijeka association Livingstone and the company Astoria designed the national cultural and tourist campaign “Friends of the Sea”. The aim is to draw attention to the role of photography in media culture and the social responsibility and constant value of promoting ecology and preserving the Adriatic Sea every year with exhibitions of large format photographs in the open air, in 13 Croatian cities to the Croatian public and all visitors. After trilogies with the themes of the seabed, the surface of the sea and Mediterranean essays, as well as historical series from the beginning of the century, and the 50s and 60s, the seventh year brings significant novelty.EXHIBITION 2016 – Friends of the Sea: “Blue Hour”Exhibition from the cycle “Friends of the seaIn 2016, on 60 large formats, it presents a series of photographic recordings made in the “blue hour”, ie in the evening after sunset or in the early morning just before its sunrise.Shots like the magical sea, lonely rocks, unusual stone from the beaches, bonaca and unbelief to the panorama of settlements from strange heights “blue clock” take us to some new views of the Croatian Adriatic – one of the most beautiful coasts in the world. The works were selected by the expert team of the festival “Rovinj-Photodays”, and exhibitors: Ivo Pervan, Mario Romulić, Dražen Stojčić, Petar Trinajstić, Goran Novotny, Bojan Bonifačić, Dalibor Talajić, Aleksandar Tomulić and Mario Đurkić.The aim of this exhibition is to show domestic and foreign visitors an enviable media culture through tourist photography, which follows life in the Croatian Adriatic in a special way.In cooperation with the tourist boards of the cities, the exhibition will be hosted : Rovinj, Pula, Mali Lošinj Baška, Krk, Cres, Zadar, Biograd na moru, Šibenik, Split, Malinska, Rijeka and Zagreb.See this great tourist story live at the Forum in Pula from 16.-23. May 2016last_img read more

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Istria remains the main tourist destination

first_imgDuring the first months of this year, she achieved Croatia 12,9 million arrivals and 75,1 million overnight stays, and this year we will have a record tourist season in the history of tourism. Today, it is more than certain that revenues from tourism will be higher than 8 billion Euros, and expert estimates say that the share of tourism in GDP will be over 20 percent (18,1 percent in 2016).Istria is once again the head of the stars of our tourism, which in the first eight months realized 20,7 million overnight stays. The most important markets of Istria are Germany, Austria, Slovenia and Italy.“The constant success of the tourism sector, as well as numerous awards from world magazines and guides, the result of many years of thoughtful work of the entire tourism sector of Istria and related partners”Said Valter Flego, County Prefect of Istria, while Denis Ivošević, Director of the Tourist Board of Istria points out that the destination Istria is recognized according to the new Master Plan for Tourism Development of Istria as a destination for sustainable and responsible development, which is a continuity from the previous Master Plan “Istria bases its development on the principles of long-term, sustainable and responsible development. “For the seventh time in a row, Rovinj has the highest number of overnight stays in Croatia, and this year the three millionth overnight stay is expected around September 7, or 6 days earlier than last year. From the beginning of the year to August 22, 2016, Rovinj had 424.817 arrivals, which is an increase of 8 percent, and 2.598.491 overnight stays or 5 percent more than last year. Rovinj has 34 beds, while 632 percent of the capacity refers to camps, 55% in private accommodation, 30% in hotels, 8% in tourist resorts and 6% in berths.After Rovinj, the second trump card of Istria is Poreč, Medulin and Umag, which each records more than a million overnight stays in the peak season. During this period, most overnight stays after Istria were recorded in Primorje-Gorski Kotar (14,4 million overnight stays), Split-Dalmatia (14 million overnight stays), Zadar (9,7 million overnight stays), Dubrovnik-Neretva (5,9 million overnight stays). and Šibenik-Knin (5,3 million overnight stays).last_img read more

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Croatian Heritage Interpretation Association Launched – Let’s Interpret Croatia!

first_imgDo you love your homeland? Are you proud of your city? Want to translate what you feel into an identity story and share it with others?Then you definitely have to join the Croatian Association for the Interpretation of Heritage, which aims to interpret Croatian heritage in a different and creative way. Or perhaps the best description is how they tell stories, stories about our rich and unique cultural heritage.The Croatian Heritage Interpretation Association was founded in April last year, the company reports museum doo, and behind it as founders are proven experts when it comes to a modern approach to heritage: Darko Babic, Assistant Professor and Head of the Department of Museology at the Faculty of Philosophy in Zagreb and a member of the Supervisory Board of the European Association for Heritage Interpretation Interpret Europe, Vlasta Klarić, Secretary General of the Association of Independent Travel Agents of Croatia and lecturer at the University “Libertas” and Dragana Lucija Ratkovic Aydemir, director of Muza and national coordinator of Interpret Europe for Croatia, and the founders set 2017 as a full step towards a new approach.Why should heritage be interpreted at all? And what is that interpretation?The story has its historical and theoretical dimension. Historically, a new approach emerged in America in 1957 with the publication of Freeman Tilden’s pioneering book, related to the management of national parks in the United States. The European story has its roots in 1975, but it was not until 1999 that a more serious step was taken when the organization Interpret Europe was included in the story, then still on an informal and voluntary basis. Today, it is the umbrella European heritage interpretation association. “Even before such a form of association around the world, it was noticed that the old concept of museology was unsustainable and that heritage preservation must be approached in a new way. In the early XNUMXs, ecomuseums emerged as a result of this new rethinking of the role of museums in society, and the relationship between man and the environment. This is where the development of the so-called new museology. The essence is that the basic subject of study can be neither a museum, nor a museum object or a collection, but a comprehensive concept of heritage. To date, the various disciplines that deal with a particular segment of heritage are closer in concept and content. All these processes have led to the establishment of a new interdisciplinary science, the science of heritage. “, says Dr. Darko Babić, president of the association Let’s Interpret Croatia.When it comes to Croatia, the notion of heritage interpretations as well as the notion of new museology was quite unknown outside a very narrow circle of experts, which certainly influenced the weak and inefficient development of heritage projects. Circumstances changed for the better with Croatia’s accession to the EU in 2013, as it opened up new ways of financing natural or cultural heritage projects, which local communities in particular began to recognize, including such plans in their development strategies.Photo: Batana EcomuseumAccording to Dragana Lucija Ratković Aydemir, vice president of the Association, a step further means – shifting the focus. “Interpretation of heritage is based on the transfer of information about some form of heritage or some heritage phenomenon (whether tangible or intangible, cultural or natural), but in a way that the focus is on the user, ie the one to whom the interpretation is addressed! The user’s interpretation of heritage needs to be encouraged, interested, entertained and touched more deeply. Quality and ingenious interpretation revives heritage, puts it at the center of the experience and connects the user with different spaces and times, expanding his knowledge of the world and of himself. Good interpretation is creative, authentic, innovative, playful and takes various forms: from museum exhibitions, visuals, interactive applications, space markings, storytelling, animated films, in short, various forms of creative and artistic expression! “, says Dragana Lucija and adds that at the same time, any serious approach to interpretation involves a lot of professional knowledge as well as serious management skills, and is based on careful research and serious strategic thinking.The different experiences of the founders have shaped the broad basic goals of the Association, and above all we want to develop awareness of the importance of the role of heritage interpreters. “A good interpretation is a guarantee of heritage preservation. This means that it must first and foremost be credible. For this to be the case, it must be based on a broad knowledge and skills of interpretation that must be set up to cover a wide range of educational and cultural goals. Only when the approach is organized in this way can it be a guarantee that heritage will be properly included in sustainable development and will serve to promote tourism. ”, points out Dragana Lucija, adding that the set goals indicate that the main activities will be focused on education, cooperation of experts, networking with international associations, publishing publications and proposing measures to include the interpretation of heritage in strategic and development plans and tourism development.Photo: Iva Silla, Secret ZagrebA particularly illustrative example of one aspect of heritage interpretation – interpretive guidance – is given Iva Silla, a young storyteller who in just a few years introduced thousands of tourists (foreign and domestic) to the secrets of Zagreb, bringing a turnaround both in the tourist offer and in the treatment of heritage topics in tourism.In her tours, she offers the “secret Zagreb”, Zagreb that hides in the alleys, corners, which keeps its folk tales about dragons, ghosts, witches below the surface and behind the facades. Last year, Iva participated in the training for a certified interpretive guide organized by Interpret Europe and claims that this is the most useful thing she has ever participated in. “Interpretation is a tool that can and must be learned. The training was attended by people from many countries, from various organizations, with different expectations and prior knowledge. This experience opened the eyes of beginners and the whole world of new possibilities was in front of them, and it gave us who are already doing interpretive walks the knowledge of how to critically look at our own work, how to improve it ”, says Iva, emphasizing that she is especially pleased that the European practice in interpretive education will soon be offered in Croatia as well.”I deal with tourism projects, but I want them not to be a mere commercial product, but to have a deeper meaning and help visitors connect with the destination., adds, hoping that the association Interpretirajmo Hrvatska will soon gather a membership that will operate in a networked way so that each member achieves even better results.And who can become a member of the Association? First of all, it doesn’t matter if you work independently or work in an institution. Anyone who participates in any segment in the interpretation of heritage or new knowledge and skills just want to master is enough to contact the mail: interpretirajmo.hrvatsku@gmail.com.Let’s interpret Croatia together!last_img read more

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Šibenik received the international cultural tourism award for the Fortress of Culture project

first_imgRELATED NEWS:A new station for public bicycles has been set up in Šibenik The City of Šibenik won the international cultural and tourist award “Plautilla”, a plaque with a gold sign, for the project Public Institution in Culture Fortress of Culture Šibenik.The award is given in the category “Historic City” to cities or institutions that have distinguished themselves in significant activities in the protection and restoration of cultural and historical heritage, and will be awarded within the 3rd International Congress of Historic Cities held from 21 to 24 March 2017. in Solin. “We are glad that the City of Šibenik won another award for the institution we founded in order to better manage our most important cultural and tourist attractions, fortresses. This is also a recognition of our fortresses, St. Mihovil and Barone, because of which the whole world comes to Šibenik”, Mayor Zeljko Buric pointed out on this occasion.Barone Fortress, in the category “Best Tourist Product”, won the “Plautilla” award, a plaque with a bronze sign, for quality and creative interpretation of cultural and historical heritage. “Through its work, the Šibenik Fortress of Culture raises awareness of the preservation and valuation of monuments and cultural heritage, indigenous sites and traditions, but also by careful planning, design and organization of numerous cultural and tourist programs creates a positive potential of Šibenik and Šibenik area. Following the exceptional results, we raise the bar every day and strive to remain the leading cultural and tourist attraction in Dalmatia. This award is another confirmation that thanks to the quality of the content we provide, we have created a positive image among the professional public.”, Said Gorana Barišić Bačelić, director of the Fortress of Culture Šibenik. The International Cultural and Tourist Award “Plautilla” for quality and innovation in the management of historic cities, in the field of interpretation and protection of cultural heritage and promotion and distribution of cultural tourism products at the 3rd International Congress of Historic Cities is awarded for the first time.Last year, in the tender of the European Regional Development Fund “Integrated Development Programs Based on the Development of Cultural Heritage”, the City of Šibenik was awarded HRK 41.486.646,05, of the total project value of HRK 49.143.692 for the project “Revitalization of the area of ​​the fortress of St. Ivana”. and the revitalization of the fortress will take 36 months. Innovative facilities, attractions and products that will be provided to visitors at the Fortress of St. Ivana will enable the positioning of this Šibenik fortress as a cultural tourist attraction with a unique offer in the Republic of Croatia.last_img read more

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Study: Children with autism benefit from theater-based program

first_imgChildren with autism who participated in a 10-week, 40-hour, theatre-based program showed significant differences in social ability compared to a group of children with autism who did not participate, according to a Vanderbilt study published in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders.Acting is an inherently interactive process that involves many aspects of socializing – observing, perceiving, interpreting and expressing thoughts, feelings and ideas. And Blythe Corbett, Ph.D., an associate professor at Vanderbilt University and investigator with the Vanderbilt Kennedy Center, calls it therapy for children with autism spectrum disorder.The findings from Corbett’s new randomized control trial, funded by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), provide some convincing evidence of the benefits of theatre for improving social competence in autism. “We measured many aspects of social ability and found significant treatment effects on social cognition, social interaction and social communication in youth with autism,” Corbett said.The study consisted of 30 children ages 8-14, with 17 randomized to an experimental group and 13 in the control group. The treatment group showed notable changes in the ability to identify and remember faces, which was corroborated by changes in brain patterns that arise when study participants saw a familiar face.Participants who participated in the theatre program also showed more group play with children outside the treatment setting, as well as improvement in social communication at home and in the community that was maintained for at least two months.In addition to utilizing theatre techniques, such as role-playing and improvisation, participants in SENSE Theatre are paired with typically developing peer actors from the University School of Nashville.These “expert models,” as Corbett calls them, are trained to provide a supportive, engaging, and dynamic learning environment for the children with autism, allowing them to practice and perform vital social skills. In fact, the finale to the 40-hour treatment is the performance of a play in which participants and peers alike share the stage in a unique collaboration between art and science.“Peers can be transformative in their ability to reach and teach children a variety of fundamental social skills,” Corbett said. “And, combined with acting techniques that enhance our ability and motivation to communicate with others, the data suggests we may be setting the stage for lasting changes in how our children with autism perceive and interact with the social world.” LinkedIn Share Share on Twittercenter_img Pinterest Email Share on Facebooklast_img read more

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Can staying active help to prevent chronic pain? Physical activity affects pain modulation in older adults

first_imgEmail Older adults with higher levels of physical activity have pain modulation patterns that might help lower their risk of developing chronic pain, reports a study in PAIN®, the official publication of the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP). The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.In tests of pain processing by the central nervous system, physically active older adults have lower pain perception and are better able to block responses to painful stimuli, according to the new research by Kelly M. Naugle, PhD, and colleagues of Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. “This study provides the first objective evidence suggesting that physical activity behavior is related to the functioning of the endogenous pain modulatory systems in older adults,” the researchers write.Being More Active, Less Sedentary, Affects Pain Perceptions in Older Adults Share on Twitter Share LinkedIncenter_img Dr. Naugle and colleagues performed a series of experiments in 51 healthy adults, aged 60 to 77. All wore an activity monitor device for one week to measure their level of physical activity. They then underwent two tests of pain modulation–functions affecting the way pain is interpreted and perceived by the central nervous system.One test, called “temporal summation,” measured the production (facilitation) of pain responses to repeated pain stimuli. The other test, called “conditioned pain modulation,” assessed the reduction (inhibition) of pain responses to competing pain stimuli.In both tests, pain modulation was significantly related to daily physical activity level. Older adults with more frequent moderate-to-vigorous physical activity had lower pain scores on the temporal summation test–indicating less pain facilitation. Those who did more light physical activity or had less sedentary time per day had lower pain scores on the conditioned pain modulation test–indicating better pain inhibition.In other words, older adults who did more moderate to vigorous physical activity perceived less facilitation of pain, while those who did at least some activity were better able to block pain perceptions. These differences may be relevant to the “central sensitization” process believed to be responsible for the transition from acute to chronic pain.Previous studies have shown that pain modulation processes are dysregulated in patients with chronic pain syndromes–for example, arthritis, back pain, and fibromyalgia. People with higher pain facilitation and lower pain inhibition are more likely to develop problems with chronic pain.The results are consistent with studies in younger adults suggesting that higher levels of physical activity are related to “more efficient conditioned pain modulation.” Older adults are more likely to be physically inactive, which might make them more vulnerable to chronic pain.“Our data suggest that low levels of sedentary behavior and greater light physical activity may be critical in maintaining effective endogenous pain inhibitory function in older adults,” Dr. Naugle and coauthors write. Further studies will be needed to test the implications for physical activity programs to reduce and prevent pain in older adults. For example, it might be possible to match the patient’s specific dysfunctional pain modulation pattern to the type of physical activity that can best improve their pain response patterns. Pinterest Share on Facebooklast_img read more

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Computational neuroscientists create a virtual brain to find insights into memory deficits in depression

first_imgLinkedIn Share Share on Facebook Pinterest In major depressive disorder patients may suffer from such severe cognitive impairments that, in some cases, are called pseudodementia. Unlike in the classic form of dementia, in pseudodementia memory recovers when the depressive episode ends. To understand this process, the scientists from Bochum developed a computational model that captures the characteristic features of the brain of a patient with depressions. They tested the ability of the model to store and recall new memories.As is the case in patients, the simulation alternated between depressive episodes and episodes without any symptoms. During a depressive episode, the brain forms fewer new neurons in the model.Whereas in previous models, memories were represented as static patterns of neural activity, the model developed by Sen Cheng and his colleagues views memories as a sequence of neural activity patterns. “This allows us not only to store events in memory but also their temporal order,” says Sen Cheng.Impact on brain stronger than thoughtThe computational model was able to recall memories more accurately, if the responsible brain region was able to form many new neurones, just like the scientists expected. However, if the brain region formed fewer new brain cells, it was harder to distinguish similar memories and to recall them separately.The computational model not only showed deficits in recalling current events, it also struggled with memories that were collected before the depressive episode. The longer the depressive episode lasted the further the memory problems reached back.“So far it was assumed that memory deficits only occur during a depressive episode,” says Sen Cheng. “If our model is right, major depressive disorder could have consequences that are more far reaching. Once remote memories have been damaged, they do not recover, even after the depression has subsided.”center_img Email During a depressive episode the ability of the brain to form new brain cells is reduced. Scientists of the Ruhr-Universität Bochum examined how this affects the memory with a computational model. It was previously known that people in an acute depressive episode were less likely to remember current events. The computational model however suggests that older memories were affected as well. How long the memory deficits reach back depends on how long the depressive episode lasts.The team around the computational neuroscientist Prof Dr Sen Cheng published their findings in the journal PLOS ONE on 7th June 2018.Computational model simulates a depressive brain Share on Twitterlast_img read more

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New research indicates political conservatism, disgust sensitivity and orderliness are psychologically interrelated

first_imgShare “We suggest that the desire to maintain order that is motivated by trait disgust may extend beyond the physical environment to maintaining an orderly social environment.”For their study, the researchers analyzed data from six different samples, which included 1,485 individuals from the United States and Canada.In all six datasets, personality was assessed using the Big Five Aspect Scale, which breaks down each of the Big Five traits — neuroticism, agreeableness, conscientiousness, extraversion, openness — into two aspects. Importantly, conscientiousness is divided into industriousness and orderliness.After controlling for age and gender, the researchers found that orderliness but not industriousness mediated the relationship between disgust sensitivity and political conservatism.In other words, those who scored higher on measures of orderliness tended to also score higher on measures of disgust sensitivity, which in turn was associated with the endorsement of conservative beliefs.“Taken together, these findings suggest that higher levels of trait disgust promote the motivation to maintain order, which contributes to the endorsement political ideologies that promote societal order,” the researchers said.The major caveat for this study is that it is correlational. “Although the present research cannot make causal claims, it highlights the role that personality plays in the relationship between basic emotions and political orientation,” the researchers explained.The study, “An orderly personality partially explains the link between trait disgust and political conservatism“, was authored by Xiaowen Xu, Annika K. Karinen, Hanah A. Chapman, Jordan B. Peterson, and Jason E. Plaks. Email Individuals who experience more disgust also tend to show a higher dispositional preference for order, according to a new study published in Cognition and Emotion, which could partly explain why there is a positive relationship between disgust sensitivity and political conservatism.Previous research has found that the way a person’s brain responds to a single disgusting image is enough to reliably predict whether he or she identifies politically as liberal or conservative.“We propose that trait disgust is associated with the specific motivation to create and maintain order. This preference for order, in turn, increases the likelihood of endorsing conservative policies (which typically seek to strengthen traditional institutions and norms),” the authors of the new study said. Share on Twittercenter_img Share on Facebook LinkedIn Pinterestlast_img read more

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NEWS SCAN: US global pandemic flu funds, new animal health center

first_imgApr 20, 2010 USDA animal health research center dedicated in IowaAgriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and other officials from the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) dedicated the final component of the National Centers for Animal Health (NCAH) yesterday. The Ames, Iowa, center houses laboratories, offices, animal space, and administrative space for top animal health scientists and researchers and will employ 700 people, according to a USDA news release. The dedication marks the completion of a long-term project to consolidate three USDA units previously operated separately at Ames. “The new NCAH will help create jobs and economic opportunity in America’s rural communities by supporting livestock producers across the country,” said Vilsack. The NCAH includes the National Animal Disease Center, operated by USDA’s Agricultural Research Service (ARS), the National Veterinary Services Laboratory, and the Center for Veterinary Biologics, operated by USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS). It will conduct research, diagnostics, and training, as well as test vaccines and other veterinary biological products. Last year, APHIS and ARS scientists tested the first samples of novel H1N1 influenza, discovering that infected pigs did not have any of the virus in their tissues and confirming the safety of the food supply.Apr 19 USDA news release US global funds for avian, pandemic flu reach $1.5 billionYesterday the US delegation to the International Ministerial Conference on Animal and Pandemic Influenza (IMCAPI) meeting in Hanoi, Vietnam, noted the country has spent more than $1.5 billion to combat global avian and pandemic influenza. This figure represents $627 million invested since the previous 2008 IMCAPI conference held in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, according to a Department of State press release. The additional US funding will be allocated to multilateral organizations, such as the World Health Organization, as well as to bilateral and regional programs. This investment includes the donation of 10% of the US H1N1 vaccine supply to developing countries, as well as in-kind assistance such as personal protective equipment, laboratory and decontamination kits, technical and humanitarian assistance, and vaccine research. The 3-day conference, which ends tomorrow, is being hosted by Vietnam with support from the US Agency for International Development, the United Nations, and the European Commission.Apr 19 Department of State press releaselast_img read more

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CDC confirms similarity of novel H3N2 viruses in Iowa, other states

first_imgNov 23, 2011 (CIDRAP News) – Testing by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has confirmed that the novel H3N2 viruses that recently sickened three Iowa children are similar to swine-origin viruses containing a gene segment from the 2009 H1N1 virus that have been identified in three other states.The CDC, in a statement late yesterday, said the gene combination was first identified in July and that the Iowa cases announced yesterday raise the total number of human infections to 10. The virus is a swine-origin triple-recombinant H3N2 that includes the matrix gene from the 2009 H1N1 virus.Unlike the other seven cases, no swine exposure has been identified in the Iowa case-patients, all young children who were in contact with each other, the CDC said. “It appears that unsustained human-to-human transmission may have occurred,” the agency said. So far there appears to be no sustained transmission, an event that would raise pandemic concerns.Of the 10 patients who were infected with the novel H3N2 virus in recent months, 9 were children and one was a 58-year-old, according to Dr. Joe Bresee, chief of the epidemiology and prevention branch in the CDC’s influenza division. Besides the three Iowa cases, the recent cases include 2 in Indiana, 3 in Pennsylvania, and 2 in Maine.CDC officials said previously that the H3N2 reassortant is related to an H3N2 strain that circulated before 1990, so people younger than 20 may be more susceptible to the novel virus than older people are, which could explain why most of the cases have been in children.But Bresee told CIDRAP News it’s too early to reach any conclusions about the reason for the age pattern of the cases. “It’s certainly true that adults may be more likely to have some protection against the virus because of previous exposure. But the age distribution with 10 cases could be a variety of things,” he said.Of the three patients who were hospitalized with their infections, at least two had underlying illnesses, Bresee said. He couldn’t characterize how sick they were, but he said none needed mechanical ventilation.Bresee also said the CDC had not identified any links between the case clusters in the different states.The CDC said that because the virus is so different from human H3N2 viruses, the seasonal vaccine is expected to provide limited cross-protection in adults and no protection in children.Dr. Patricia Quinlisk, medical director for the Iowa Department of Public Health (IDPH), told CIDRAP News that having been immunized against seasonal flu or sick with flu in the 1990s might have provided a priming effect to the immune system against the novel virus. If that’s the case, this year’s vaccine may provide a limited boosting effect that could provide some cross-protection, she added.Health officials are concerned about the limited human-to-human spread, Quinlisk said, though clusters of novel swine-related influenza infections typically pop up, then die out. Over the past several years, Iowa has had three other similar events.However, she said the IDPH is looking for more cases, and so far no more illnesses have been reported in people who had contact with the three children.The main message for preventing novel flu is the same as for seasonal flu, especially as Americans prepare to gather to celebrate the Thanksgiving holiday, Quinlisk said. “The big push is to stay home when you’re sick.”The CDC said several states have reported the novel virus in swine, but did not identify the states. It emphasized that swine influenza viruses do not spread through contact with pork or pork products and that eating properly handled and cooked pork is safe.As a routine preparedness measure, the CDC has developed a candidate vaccine virus and provided it to manufacturers, in case the new virus becomes able to spread easily, posing a pandemic threat.See also:Nov 22 CDC statementNov 22 CIDRAP News story “Iowa reports three novel swine-origin H3N2 cases”Previous CIDRAP News reports on novel H3N2 cases:Nov 4Oct 21Sep 6Sep 2last_img read more

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